Alaska Sleep Education Center

9 Alternative Treatments to CPAP Therapy

Posted by Kevin Phillips on Jul 29, 2014 3:08:00 PM

An estimated 20 million American adults are believed to have obstructive sleep apnea, with the majority of those cases going undiagnosed. Sleep apnea used to be merely considered an annoyance by many, but in recent decades with more information on the dangers of untreated sleep apnea, more and more people have begun seeking treatment for their chronic sleep disorders.

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Topics: CPAP success, children, BPAP, oral appliance

Sleep Treatment Options For Those Who Can't Tolerate CPAP

Posted by Jack Johnson on Dec 20, 2013 11:00:00 AM

An estimated 18 million Americans suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), with many of those cases undiagnosed. OSA can come with serious side effects and consequences including fatigue, obesity, and an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and diabetes.

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Topics: CPAP Masks, sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea, sleep disorders, apnea, CPAP, oral appliance

OSA and Dental Considerations

Posted by Jennifer Christensen on Oct 25, 2013 2:00:00 PM

Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a potentially serious sleep disorder in which a child’s breathing stops and starts during sleep. Child OSA is most commonly found in children between the ages of 2 and 6, but can occur at any age.

There are a variety of treatments for OSA. Some of the most common devices to help are a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure machine (CPAP), mouth appliances, and specially designed pillows. Dentofacial orthopedics is another option for early treatment and even prevention of OSA. These orthopedics can open the airway 10mm or more by developing a facial profile to an optimum situation, which is a process to increase the airway space. Treatment can be started as young as 2 years old, and can help your child to reach the maximum sleep potential by reducing problems with breathing, swallowing, and sleeping.

Other oral treatments include a Mandibular Repositioning device and a Tongue Retaining device. These devices open your airway by bringing your lower jaw forward during sleep. They are acrylic and fit inside your mouth, much like an athletic mouth guard. Others may fit around your head and chin to adjust the position of your lower jaw as well.

Dental devices are only effective for mild to moderate sleep apnea. There are also a number of possible troubling side effects from using the dental the devices to include soreness, saliva build-up, nausea, and damage or permanent change in position of the jaw, teeth, and mouth.

It is very important to get fitted by a dentist specializing in sleep apnea. Also, see your dentist on a regular basis for any dental problems that may occur, and check with your sleep specialist to see if you are a proper candidate for OSA.

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Topics: CPAP success, CPAP Masks, alaska sleep clinic, Sleep, sleep disorders, apnea, oral appliance

Children's Sleep Study

Posted by Jennifer Christensen on Oct 14, 2013 3:00:00 PM

For children, sleep problems tend to get progressively worse overtime if not treated. For instance, night terrors as a toddler might lead to a child who sleepwalks in the future. There are generally two different types of sleep problems; behavioral and physiological. At this point, a sleep study would be assigned to gather additional information for a diagnosis. Parents will also spend the night in the same room but in a different bed during the study.

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Topics: CPAP Masks, alaska sleep clinic, sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea, trouble sleeping, sleep study, apnea, children, oral appliance, sleep and children

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