Alaska Sleep Education Center

Avoid the Pitfalls of “Fall Back” this Year

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Sep 10, 2018 1:01:00 PM

On Sunday, November 6th, most of us in the U.S. will be turning our clocks back one hour. Just the thought of this change instills panic in parents who have just gotten their little one on that great routine!

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Topics: sleep and children, sleep habits, daylight savings, losing sleep

While We Sleep, Our Mind Goes on an Amazing Journey: Part 2 (From the August 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine)

Posted by MICHAEL FINKEL, National Geographic Magazine, August 2018 on Aug 28, 2018 3:40:02 PM

Wile, the seven-year-old son of photographer Magnus Wennman, watches cartoons on his iPad— a modern bedtime ritual for some. The stimulation may drive off sleep, but so does the backlit screen: Light at night inhibits the production of melatonin, the hormone that helps regulate our daily biological rhythms.
 

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Topics: sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm, losing sleep, wellness

While We Sleep, Our Mind Goes on an Amazing Journey: From the August 2018 issue of National Geographic magazine.

Posted by MICHAEL FINKEL, National Geographic Magazine, August 2018 on Aug 27, 2018 2:11:00 PM

Joe Diemand, 76, has spent the past 20 years as a truck driver, sometimes driving all night. Such work, he says, leaves you “so tired that you can’t sleep.” The World Health Organization has described night shift work as “probably carcinogenic to humans.

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Topics: sleep deprivation, circadian rhythm, losing sleep, wellness

The Effects of Shift Work on Sleep

Posted by Stefanie Leiter on Aug 18, 2018 12:24:00 AM

Shift work is defined as schedules outside the typical 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. day. Roughly 15 percent of full-time U.S. employees work on shifts outside this traditional schedule. For many, shift work is part of the job as service occupations like healthcare professionals and protective services  are needed 365 days a year 24 hours a day. 

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Topics: insomnia, life with sleep apnea, get better sleep, circadian rhythm, losing sleep, work

3 Sleep Disorders That Might Be Causing You to Feel Tired All the Time

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Aug 15, 2018 3:30:00 PM

Many of us will occasionally experience days where we simply feel tired all day long. Usually this is caused by poor sleep the night before, an intense workout the previous day, or even symptoms of a cold or flu. The feelings of extreme fatigue are often remedied with a little rest during the day or some good old fashioned sleep the next night.

For some however, feeling tired and rundown during waking hours is an everyday occurrence. One that with continued lack of sleep can prove to be harmful to their health, and result in accidents or even death from dozing off at inappropriate times. While there are many possible causes of extreme daytime sleepiness including dietary deficiencies, depression, diabetes, anemia, or thyroid problems, chronic daytime fatigue can very likely be caused by a sleep disorder.

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Topics: Narcolepsy, losing sleep

Why Too Much Screen Time Can Lead to Sleep Deprivation for Alaskans

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Aug 6, 2018 12:55:00 PM

Video screens of many shapes and sizes are part of life for modern Alaskans.

Decades ago, a television in the bedroom was considered an extravagance. Today, it’s commonplace, but the TV might not be turned on if someone’s eyes are focused on a laptop computer. Or a smartphone. Or a portable DVD player. Or an iPad. Or a handheld video game. Of course, some Alaskans do watch TV while working on their laptop and checking their smartphones.

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Topics: insomnia, tired, losing sleep

Seven Signs You Might Have Sleep Apnea

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Aug 1, 2018 2:07:00 PM

Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders afflicting approximately 20 million adults in the U.S. with an estimated 80% of cases going undiagnosed. Many people may be unaware that a sleep disorder is the underlying cause of their health problems, and others may be aware of their sleep disorder but uninformed of the severe consequences of untreated sleep apnea.

Sleep apnea is characterized by frequent breaks or pauses in breathing during sleep. There are 3 forms of sleep apnea: Central sleep apnea (CSA) in which the pauses are due to the brain failing to signal the respiratory system to breathe; obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in which breathing is interrupted by a physical blockage in the upper airways, often caused by soft tissues of the throat and tongue collapsing into the airway; and complex/mixed sleep apnea which is a combination of central sleep apnea and obstructive sleep apnea.

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Topics: sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea, sleep problems, sleep deprivation, losing sleep

Central Sleep Apnea: A Simple Explanation

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Jul 31, 2018 6:09:00 PM

In sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea is the most common condition that’s seen, but a significant number of people with obstructive sleep apnea will also have central sleep apnea. Central sleep apnea is thought to be a condition that’s associated with a number of different neurologic problems, as well as heart or kidney failure. During the night, people with central sleep apnea stop breathing when signals in the brain that tells the body to breathe don’t work properly. No effort is even made to inhale. In contrast, with obstructive sleep apnea, an effort is made to breathe in, but because of collapse in the upper airways, air can’t get into the lungs.

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Topics: Snoring, losing sleep, CSA

Dorm Sleeping: Advice for the College Student

Posted by Stefanie Leiter on Jul 26, 2018 1:00:00 PM

For 18 years, your parents created structure. There was a consistent dinner time, bedtime, and wake up time. The refrigerator maybe even had a color-coded list showing who in the house had what activity at what time and in what location.

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Topics: sleep study, losing sleep, sleep hygiene

The Cost of Losing Sleep

Posted by Jennifer Hines on Jul 23, 2018 12:34:11 PM

Scientists have added up the cost of losing a nights sleep. By measuring the actual number of calories the body expends to fuel an all-nighter versus a good night’s sleep, researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder calculate that a full night of sleep helps the body conserve as much energy as is in a glass of warm milk.
Missing a night of sleep forces the body to burn about an extra 161 calories than it would have during eight hours of sleep (not counting what’s used in moving around while awake); but it’s no weight-loss miracle: The body tries to make up for the deficit by saving more energy than usual the next day and night, researchers report in the January Journal of Physiology.

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Topics: losing sleep

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